Masthead
 
July 2018
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Here’s Why it’s Important to Support your Breastfeeding Co-workers

Support from female co-workers may be even more important to new moms who are breastfeeding than getting encouragement from their significant others, close friends and relatives, says a new study. According to Michigan State University and Texas Christian University researchers, the more support women receive from their colleagues, the more successful they are in believing they can continue breastfeeding. While support from family or friends is important, surprisingly, co-worker support has a stronger effect.

The study
, now published in the journal Health Communication, is the first to focus specifically on the effect female co-workers have on colleagues who want to continue breastfeeding by pumping milk at work.

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Joining Forces to Advance New Models of Care and Address Nursing Workforce Issues

Dean Randolph Rasch among leaders to serve on the newly formed American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) Advisory Committee. They will be working to co-create models of care, workforce readiness, and a lifelong continuum of learning to optimize the impact of nursing on health and wellness.


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Fall Prevention for Orthopedic Patients: Q&A with Kate Bredeweg

Spartan Nurse Kate Bredeweg, CON CNS ’16, is a Clinical Nurse Specialist for Spectrum Health. She works to align policies and practices around fall prevention with the best available evidence to reduce patient falls and falls with injury throughout the healthcare system.

An accomplishment of Bredeweg’s is her leadership as the chair / clinical lead on the Falls Prevention Committee and their collaboration with numerous groups, ultimately transforming the falls program from a "one size fits all" to an individualized intervention approach. In line with best practice evidence, they now select fall prevention interventions based on the patient's unique risk factors.



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“I have always been inspired by my interactions with nurses.”
Caroline Maass
Clinical Nurse Specialist Student
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Dieting For The Right Reasons

Cancer remains one of the top chronic diseases in the world. Many cancers are not preventable. However, it is possible to be proactive in risk reduction when it comes to breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and a few others. One way we can actively work to reduce cancer risk is by the foods we eat.

“Earlier this year, U.S. News and World Report made a list of the Best Diet Rankings of 2018 to help people choose the diet that best meets their needs,” stated Kelly Brittain. “Inspired by this list, I decided to examine how the top five stack up in terms of reducing cancer risk.” Here are the top five best diets, according to U.S. News and World Report and Brittain’s cancer risk reduction score:
#5: The MIND Diet
#4: Weight Watchers Diet
#3: The Flexitarian Diet
#2: Mediterranean Diet
#1: DASH Diet



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RESEARCH
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Benefits of Yoga and Meditation for Patients with Cancer

Yoga is a complementary mind–body therapy that may help people manage cancer symptoms or adverse effects of treatments and improve their quality of life. The summary of research from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health on mind–body interventions suggests that yoga may help with anxiety, depression, distress, and stress in people with cancer. Results of studies of patients with early-stage breast cancer and survivors suggest that yoga may help to reduce fatigue. Meditation, one of the tools of yoga, has similarly been shown to address anxiety, stress, fatigue, and general mood and sleep disturbances.

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PUBLICATION SPOTLIGHT

Science Direct published the article “Building Sangha in the American Healthcare Setting for Persons with Chronic Disease” written by Roxane Raffin Chan PhD, RN AHN-BC and BSN student Jamie Beaulieu.

The Oncology Nursing Foundation published the article "Factors Associated with Medication Beliefs in Patients with Cancer: An Integrative Review" written by 2018 PhD graduate Victoria Marshall and University Distinguished Professor Barbara Given, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAPOS.

The Frontiers in Public Health accepted the manuscript Four Methods of Recruiting Couples into a Longitudinal Study of Physical Activity in People with Osteoarthritis: Recruitment, Retention, and Lessons Learned by Dana Carthron, PhD, RN.

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NEW STAFF APPOINTMENT

Stephanie Hoenig is the new Assistant Director of Development. Stephanie worked for Make – A – Wish Michigan, Michigan Medicine and DMC Children’s Hospital of Michigan. She is also a Spartan, having received a Bachelor of Arts in Marketing from the Eli Broad College of Business and a Bachelor of Arts in German from the College of Arts and Letters.

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AWARDS, HONORS & NURSING LEADERSHIP

Catherine
Clarey-Sanford

PhD, RN, CWOCN

 

Appointed to the National Wound, Ostomy, Continence Educations Programs Accreditation Committee

Susan Dunn

PhD, RN, FAHA

 

Professional Development Award from Sigma Theta Tau, Alpha Psi Chapter

Joanne Goldbort

PhD, RN

 

Presentation accepted as a poster display for the 2018 Michigan Premier Public Health Conference


Jackeline Iseler

DNP, RN, ACNS-BC

 

Reappointed to the Michigan Board of Nursing

Linda Keilman

DNP, GNP-BC, FAANP

 

Trifecta Initiative Facilitating Funds Award

Ana Kelly

CON PhD ‘15

 

Receives Fulbright Award to Malawi

Rebecca Lehto

PhD, RN

 

To be inducted as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing

Mary Smania

DNP, FNP-BC, AGN-BC

 

Inducted as a Fellow in the American Association of Nurse Practitioners

Anne Thomas

PhD, ANP-BC, GNP, FAANP

 

To serve on The George Washington University Health Workforce Institute and School of Nursing National Advisory Board for the Social Mission of Nursing Education Study



HAPPENINGS

JOB OPENINGS